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Discovering SGS - Sulforaphane Glucosinolate Compound

Discovering SGS - Sulforaphane Glucosinolate Compound

Sulforaphane Glucosinolate, or SGS, is a naturally occurring compound found in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, and kale. It is an antioxidant that may have several health and wellness properties.* In this article, we will explore the potential benefits of SGS, its mechanisms of action, and the best food sources of this unique nutrient.

Potential benefits of SGS

  1. Antioxidant properties: SGS is an antioxidant, and as such it may help to support cells from oxidative damage. It may play a role on free radicals in the body, which are unstable molecules that can damage cells.*
  2. Anti-inflammatory potential: SGS might have some anti-inflammatory properties for specific individuals and populations.*
  3. Detoxification: SGS may also help to support the body's natural detoxification processes. It could help activate enzymes that are involved in the detoxification of harmful substances in the body.*

SGS - Sulforaphane Glucosinolate supplement

Mechanisms of action

SGS is thought to work by activating a specific signaling pathway in the body known as the Nrf2 pathway. This pathway is known to help regulate the expression of genes that may be involved in antioxidant and detoxification processes, inflammation, and cell growth.*

When SGS is consumed, it is broken down in the body into sulforaphane, which is the active form of the compound. Sulforaphane may then activate the Nrf2 pathway, which may help to support cells from oxidative damage and support the body's natural detoxification processes.

SGS supplement

Best food sources of SGS

SGS is found in a variety of cruciferous vegetables, including:

  1. Broccoli: Broccoli is one of the best food sources of SGS. One cup of cooked broccoli might provide approximately 50-100 milligrams of SGS.
  2. Cauliflower: Cauliflower is another good source of SGS. One cup of cooked cauliflower might provide approximately 20-30 milligrams of SGS.
  3. Kale: Kale is a nutrient-dense vegetable that is also high in SGS. One cup of cooked kale might provide approximately 20-30 milligrams of SGS.
  4. Brussels Sprouts: Brussels sprouts are another cruciferous vegetable that is high in SGS. One cup of cooked Brussels sprouts might provide approximately 15-30 milligrams of SGS.

In conclusion, SGS is an antioxidant that offers unique and different properties. It is known to work by activating the Nrf2 pathway, which might help to support cells from oxidative damage and may help support the body's natural detoxification processes.* You can find Sulforaphane Glucosinolate, or SGS, in a variety of foods. Read also more about SGS and DIM and our guide to a DIM supplement.

As always, talk to your doctor before taking any supplements. Get professional advice if you think you might need an SGS supplement or Sulforaphane Glucosinolate supplement, or are already taking one to ensure you're not exceeding the amounts you may need. 

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