Zoom Amen Zinc Copper Supplement with Probiotics Zinc Picolinate Glycinate Chelate 2 Billion CFUs
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Amen Zinc Copper with Probiotics, Zinc Picolinate, Glycinate Chelate, 2 Billion CFUs

$19.99

50 mg zinc supplement with copper and probiotics in a convenient all-in-one capsule solution. 1 capsule a day. 3 months supply.

Product Details

  • 50 mg zinc as zinc picolinate
  • Copper as glycinate chelate
  • Probiotics 2 billion CFUs*
  • Vegan
  • Milk, tree nuts, wheat, peanuts & soy-free
  • Paleo & keto friendly, gluten-free & non-GMO
  • 1 capsule a day
  • 3 months supply
  • Made in the USA in a cGMP facility
  • 3rd party tested

Zinc and copper are essential minerals that our body doesn’t naturally produce. They come from food or supplementation. This vegan formula is easy to use, offers both minerals and adds a probiotic strain in a convenient one capsule a day solution.

50 mg zinc supplement with copper and probiotics in a convenient all-in-one capsule solution. 1 capsule a day. 3 months supply.

Product Details

  • 50 mg zinc as zinc picolinate
  • Copper as glycinate chelate
  • Probiotics 2 billion CFUs*
  • Vegan
  • Milk, tree nuts, wheat, peanuts & soy-free
  • Paleo & keto friendly, gluten-free & non-GMO
  • 1 capsule a day
  • 3 months supply
  • Made in the USA in a cGMP facility
  • 3rd party tested

Ingredients Highlights

  • Zinc

    50 mg zinc as zinc picolinate

  • Copper

    2 mg copper as glycinate chelate

  • Probiotics

    B. Subtilis - 2 billion CFUs*

Zinc, copper, probiotics

Non-GMO & made in the USA

  • 3 months supply
  • Vegan
  • Non-GMO, gluten-free, soy-free
  • No fillers
  • No artificial ingredients, chemicals, antibiotics or color additives
  • Dairy, peanut, soy & gluten-free
  • No shellfish or crustaceans
  • Made in the USA 
  • Manufactured in a cGMP certified facility
  • Adults take 1 capsule daily with 8 ounces of water or your favorite beverage. May be taken with or without food.

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Zinc (as Zinc Picolinate), Copper (as Glycinate Chelate), B. subtilis (2 Billion CFU).

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Take 1 capsule daily with 8 ounces of water or your favorite beverage. May be taken with or without food.

CAUTION: Do not exceed recommended dose. Please use caution if you have allergies or sensitivities to any of the listed ingredients. Pregnant or nursing mothers and individuals with a known medical condition should consult a physician before using this or any dietary supplement. Use only as directed. If gastrointestinal discomfort (including bloating, cramps, diarrhea, or other digestive upset) or other sensitivity is experienced stop taking the product immediately. If you are pregnant, nursing, or have a medical condition, please consult with your physician before use. If you have any questions about consuming this dietary supplement, consult with your health care professional before using. If you use prescription drugs or over-the-counter medications, are unaware of your current medical condition or have a pre-existing medical condition(s), consult with your health care professional before using. Discontinue use immediately if you experience any adverse symptoms or reactions while taking this product. Discontinue use 2 weeks prior to surgery. Do not use if your health status is unknown. Do not use if safety seal is damaged or missing. Keep out of reach of children and pets. Store in a cool, dry place, away from heat moisture.

Zinc

Rondanelli M, Miccono A, Lamburghini S, et al. Self-Care for Common Colds: The Pivotal Role of Vitamin D, Vitamin C, Zinc, and Echinacea in Three Main Immune Interactive Clusters (Physical Barriers, Innate and Adaptive Immunity) Involved during an Episode of Common Colds-Practical Advice on Dosages and on the Time to Take These Nutrients/Botanicals in order to Prevent or Treat Common Colds. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2018;2018:5813095. Published 2018 Apr 29. PMCID: PMC5949172

Singh M, Das RR. WITHDRAWN: Zinc for the common cold. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015;2015(4):CD001364. Published 2015 Apr 30. PMCID: PMC6457799

 Hulisz D. (2004). Efficacy of zinc against common cold viruses: an overview. Journal of the American Pharmacists Association : JAPhA, 44(5), 594603. PMID: 15496046

Gammoh, N. Z., & Rink, L. (2017). Zinc in Infection and Inflammation. Nutrients, 9(6), 624. PMCID: PMC5490603

Wintergerst, E. S., Maggini, S., & Hornig, D. H. (2007). Contribution of selected vitamins and trace elements to immune function. Annals of nutrition & metabolism, 51(4), 301323. DOI: 10.1159/000107673

Sapkota, M., & Knoell, D. L. (2018). Essential Role of Zinc and Zinc Transporters in Myeloid Cell Function and Host Defense against Infection. Journal of immunology research, 2018, 4315140. DOI: 10.1155/2018/4315140

Chasapis, C. T., Loutsidou, A. C., Spiliopoulou, C. A., & Stefanidou, M. E. (2012). Zinc and human health: an update. Archives of toxicology, 86(4), 521534. DOI: 10.1007/s00204-011-0775-1

Copper

Clinical and Research Information on Drug-Induced Liver Injury [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; 2012-. Copper. [Updated 2017 Oct 30].

Harris, E. D., Rayton, J. K., Balthrop, J. E., DiSilvestro, R. A., & Garcia-de-Quevedo, M. (1980). Copper and the synthesis of elastin and collagen. Ciba Foundation symposium, 79, 163182. DOI: 10.1002/9780470720622.ch9

Borkow G. Using Copper to Improve the Well-Being of the Skin. Curr Chem Biol. 2014;8(2):89-102. doi: PMCID: PMC4556990

Yu L, Liou IW, Biggins SW, et al. Copper Deficiency in Liver Diseases: A Case Series and Pathophysiological Considerations. Hepatol Commun. 2019;3(8):1159-1165. Published 2019 Jun 26. doi: 10.1002/hep4.1393

Klevay L. M. (2000). Dietary copper and risk of coronary heart disease. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 71(5), 12131214. DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/71.5.1213

Klevay L. M. (2000). Cardiovascular disease from copper deficiency--a history. The Journal of nutrition, 130(2S Suppl), 489S492S. DOI: 10.1093/jn/130.2.489S

Percival S. S. (1998). Copper and immunity. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 67(5 Suppl), 1064S1068S. DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/67.5.1064S

Mahdavi-Roshan M, Ebrahimi M, Ebrahimi A. Copper, magnesium, zinc and calcium status in osteopenic and osteoporotic post-menopausal women. Clin Cases Miner Bone Metab. 2015;12(1):18-21. PMCID: PMC4469220

Probiotics

Verna EC, Lucak S. Use of probiotics in gastrointestinal disorders: what to recommend?. Therap Adv Gastroenterol. 2010;3(5):307319. doi: 10.1177/1756283X10373814

Ritchie, Marina & Romanuk, Tamara. (2012). A Meta-Analysis of Probiotic Efficacy for Gastrointestinal Diseases. PloS one. 7. e34938. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0034938

Nancy Toedter Williams, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCNSP, Probiotics, American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy, Volume 67, Issue 6, 15 March 2010, Pages 449458. DOI: 10.2146/ajhp090168

Salem I, Ramser A, Isham N, Ghannoum MA. The Gut Microbiome as a Major Regulator of the Gut-Skin Axis. Front Microbiol. 2018;9:1459. Published 2018 Jul 10. doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2018.01459

Ellis SR, Nguyen M, Vaughn AR, et al. The Skin and Gut Microbiome and Its Role in Common Dermatologic Conditions. Microorganisms. 2019;7(11):550. Published 2019 Nov 11. doi: 10.3390/microorganisms7110550

Szántó, M, Dózsa, A, Antal, D, Szabó, K, Kemény, L, Bai, P. Targeting the gutskin axisProbiotics as new tools for skin disorder management? Exp Dermatol. 2019; 28: 1210 1218. DOI: 10.1111/exd.14016

M. Rahmati Roudsari, R. Karimi, S. Sohrabvandi & A. M. Mortazavian (2015) Health Effects of Probiotics on the Skin, Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 55:9, 1219-1240. DOI: 10.1080/10408398.2012.680078

Kechagia M, Basoulis D, Konstantopoulou S, et al. Health benefits of probiotics: a review. ISRN Nutr. 2013;2013:481651. Published 2013 Jan 2. PMID: 24959545

Di Stefano, M, MD; Miceli, E, MD; Armellini, E, MD; Missanelli, A, MD; Corazza, G R, MD Probiotics and Functional Abdominal Bloating, Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology: July 2004 - Volume 38 - Issue - p S102-S103 doi: 10.1097/01.mcg.0000128939.40458.25

Reid G. (2017). The development of probiotics for women's health. Canadian journal of microbiology, 63(4), 269277. DOI: 10.1139/cjm-2016-0733

Rhayat L, Maresca M, Nicoletti C, et al. Effect of Bacillus subtilis Strains on Intestinal Barrier Function and Inflammatory Response. Front Immunol. 2019;10:564. Published 2019 Mar 29. DOI: 10.3389/fimmu.2019.00564

Yang, M., Zhu, G., Korza, G., Sun, X., Setlow, P., & Li, J. (2020). Engineering Bacillus subtilis as a Versatile and Stable Platform for Production of Nanobodies. Applied and environmental microbiology, 86(8), e02938-19. DOI: 10.1128/AEM.02938-19